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March 25, 2010

Oversleeping: More Harmful than Helpful

Oversleeping is another one of those situations that really does you more harm than good. Although it seems as though sleeping longer could benefit you, it has actually been linked to a number of medical problems, the most harmful being diabetes, and heart disease.

Many of us don’t know how much sleep we need as individuals to function our best. The average amount of sleep varies over your lifetime due to a number of factors such as age, activity level, general health, and lifestyle routines. If you are experiencing a period of stress, for example, your energy levels will decrease much faster than if you are not stressed therefore you will require more sleep. The average adult functions best after 7 or 8 hours of sleep, however there are many adults who find they only need 5 or 6 and others who need 9 or 10 hours of sleep to feel their best.

In order to determine the number of hours that your body requires for optimal function, keep a sleep diary. Record how many hours you sleep each night, the times you went to sleep and got up, how you felt in the morning, afternoon, and evening, if you had any bad dreams, and your general mood. The patterns you see will start to give you an idea of the number of hours you need.

Several recent studies have found that too much or too little sleep can be linked to many medical problems including obesity, diabetes, and even death.

Diabetes – In a recent study at the Boston University School of Medicine found that participants that had reported sleeping less than 6 hours or more than 9 hours a day had an 50% greater risk of diabetes than those who slept for 7 or 8 hours.

Obesity – In addition, another study found that people who slept for 9 or 10 hours every night were 21% more likely to become obese over a six year period than the people who slept for 7 or 8 hours. The relationship between sleep and obesity remained the same even after food intake and exercise were taken into account.

Heart Disease – A study involving nearly 72,000 women found that women who slept 9 to 11 hours each night were 38% more likely to have coronary heart disease than women who slept for 8 hours.

Death – Frighteningly enough, several studies have found that people who sleep 9 hours or more a night have significantly higher death rates than people who sleep between 7 and 8 hours a night.

Headaches – Sleeping longer than usual on a weekend can cause headaches. Researchers believe that oversleeping has an effect on neurotransmitters in the brain, including serotonin. People who sleep during the day and disrupt their nighttime sleep might also find that they are suffering from headaches in the morning.

Other studies have found that depression and back pain are also associated with oversleeping.

Pharmapassport.com, a Canadian Internet-based pharmacy intermediary (license #BC X23), provides customers with low prices and long-term prescriptions drugs. All Canadian prescriptions are filled by a professionally registered pharmacist. For more information on how to order Canada drugs safely and securely call 1-866-293-3904 or visit http://www.pharmapassport.com/ – a trusted and reliable Canadian online pharmacy that has filled over 1 million prescriptions.

December 10, 2009

High salt intake may put you at risk of cardiovascular disease

The British Medical journal recently published research which observed the notes of 13 studies from the years 1966 – 2008. The study looks at the relationship between salt intake and stroke and cardiovascular disease affecting the heart. According to the research, a high salt intake is definitely associated with an increased risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease, However because of the imprecise measurements of salt intake, these effects are most likely underestimated. The result supports the role of a possibly substantial population reduction in salt intake for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. The association was greater in those who consumed a higher amount of salt.

According to Marion Nestle, 80 percent of salt intake comes from processed and ready-made foods, therefore the best way to prevent cardiovascular disease due to high salt intake is to regulate the salt in the food industry. If we want to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, salt levels would need to be reduced throughout the entire board of food production.

One major issue, however, is that because our salt intake from processed foods is so high, the taste of salt depends on how much we eat. If salt levels were reduced in the food industry it would be noticed by consumers.

Considering that over 570,000 Americans die each year due to cardiovascular disease and stroke, the most important concern right now is that we need to educate the public on the issue in order to successfully lower salt intake and the risk of cardiovascular disease. People need to know the danger in eating too much salt, and they need to know how to lower their salt intake. Reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke by eating at home. Eating more home-cooked meals is a good place to start if processed foods and restaurant food are the biggest threat for high salt levels.

Pharmapassport.com, a Canadian Internet-based pharmacy intermediary (license #BC X23), provides customers with low prices and long-term prescriptions drugs. All Canadian prescriptions are filled by a professionally registered pharmacist. For more information on how to order Canada drugs safely and securely call 1-866-293-3904 or visit http://www.pharmapassport.com/ – a trusted and reliable Canadian online pharmacy that has filled over 1 million prescriptions.